THERE WAS ONCE A SMALL DRAB TIN SHED WITH ‘TRAM’ PAINTED ON THE ROOF.

That was the beginning of an adventure and in a true Thomas the Tank Engine story it heralded the Rye and Camber Tramway as seen from The Lookout on Hilders Cliff, Rye.

Oh what fun it would have been to ride the little train from Rye, with bags crammed with all that was needed for a day on the beach, excited children and even more excited parents.

Sadly the little train is no more but you can still Walk the Line from Rye to Camber Sands.

Just one of the walks in a newly revised

‘More Walks around Rye’

From History Walks, Walk, Talks and Books

www.1066harorldsway.co.uk

Available from Rye Tourist Point, Rye Heritage Centre, Adams of Rye and Tea beside the Orchard, Icklesham.

Review: Capital to Coast: 1066 Harold’s Way

Ten-sixty-six is the date burned into the memory of every schoolchild of my generation – the date of the Battle of Hastings and the last successful invasion of England by William of Normandy.

We were all taught how Harold Godwinson, newly crowned King of England, rushed north to defeat the invading army of his brother Tostig and Harold Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in September 1066. Then, on hearing that William had landed in Kent, he had to rush south again to meet his destiny, and that of England, at the Battle of Hastings on October 14.

So the first question to be asked of this nonetheless informative and historically rich guidebook is why 1066 Harold’s Way doesn’t start at the Stamford Bridge battlefield near York and end at Hastings? (Apparently, the author did discuss the route from Stamford Bridge but found it difficult to establish a clear route on rights-of-way).

So this 100-mile, 10-day route instead follows what could have been Harold’s route from Westminster Abbey to Senlac Hill, east to Rochester and then due south roughly following the old Roman Road through Maidstone, Bodiam and Battle.

The route is described in the author’s usual meticulous detail, but it is the regular “Reflections” and the occasional excerpts from The Saxon Times, an imaginary newspaper from the period, which sets this apart as an entertaining and enlightening read, whether you do the walk or not.

Roly Smith

By 0utdoor Writers and Photographers Guild Autumn 2022

WALKING CAPITAL TO COAST: 1066 HAROLD’S WAY

From History Walks, Talks and Books

MORE THAN JUST FOOTSTEPS ON A PATH

For more information visit: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

WHERE WILL YOU WALK IN 2023

Imagine almost 1000 years ago, leaving London to march in the army of King Harold

Marching to a Battle that will decide the future of England.

There can be no more inspirational walk from London.

For the last nine years, 1066 Harold’s Way has fired the imagination for countless walkers to begin their adventure and walk to Battle.

With the addition of a link to Hastings Castle, 1066 Harold’s Way is now the perfect Capital to Coast walk.

WALKING CAPITAL TO COAST: 1066 HAROLD’S WAY

From History Walks, Talks and Books

MORE THAN JUST FOOTSTEPS ON A PATH

For more information visit: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

Imagine the Rye and Camber Tramway

What fun it would be if you could ride a tramway from Rye to Camber Sands.

The Golf Course Station is a ghost of stations past and the rails are etched in concrete

Although the little train has long gone, the route lives on.

Walk into big skies and a broad landscape

Across the golf course to the dunes, the beach and Camber Sands.

And imagine riding the Rye and Camber Tramway

Book 12: More Walks around Rye from History Walks, Walk, Talks and Books

www.1066harorldsway.co.uk

Available from Rye Tourist Point, Rye Heritage Centre, Adams of Rye and Tea beside the Orchard (Icklesham)

And by Mail Order from History Walks

A Domesday Circular: Pleidena (Playden)

Updating this short circular walk from Rye to Playden that’s one of the walks in More Walks around Rye.

Halfway round is the King’s Head, perfect for that little reward before the walk back to Rye that’s downhill all the way.

With its long history, Playden stands on a hill one mile north of Rye. and overlooks the old Appledore Estuary. Mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, there is likely to have been an earlier settlement, safe on the ridge, where even the Romans may have had a villa or two overlooking the sea.

More Walks around Rye from History Walks, Walk, Talks and Books

www.1066harorldsway.co.uk

Available from Rye Tourist Point, Rye Heritage Centre, Adams of Rye and Tea beside the Orchard (Icklesham)

TOOT  – tot(e) – look out hill (oe)

Toot Rock at Pett Level

It’s all in the name and perfect for looking out for 8th century Danes and Picts, 11th century Normans, the French and latterly WWII invasions.

It’s worth the climb just to stand on Toot Rock and lookout over the sea.

The Pett Level circular needs updating. Little has changed but the café is now called ‘eaters@pett’ and there’s views of the sea and the old Smugglers Inn is undergoing a transformation into a high-end fish restaurant – no muddy boots there then.

More Walks around Rye from History Walks, Walk, Talks and Books

www.1066harorldsway.co.uk

Available from Rye Tourist Point, Rye Heritage Centre, Adams of Rye and Tea beside the Orchard, Icklesham.

Buy Short Walks from BOOKBUSTER

You can now find all the ‘Short Walks in 1066 Country’ at BOOKBUSTER, the latest stockist of History Walks Books.

Bookbuster can be found at 39 Queens Road, Hastings TN34 1RE, opposite Marks and Spencer, close to Priory Meadow.

History Walks Books can also be bought at:

Hastings

  • Hastings Contemorary, Winkle Island, Rock-a- Nore
  • Old Hastings Preservation Society, History House, Courthouse Street
  • Hastings Fishermen’s Museum, Rock-a-Nore, Hastings

 St Leonards on Sea

  • The Bookkeeper, 1A Kings Road
  • Studio 4 Frames, Marine Court

Battle

  • British Design British Made, High Street

Bexhill

  • De La Warr Pavillion
  • Bexhill Museum

Rye

  • Rye Information Point, Rye Town Hall, Market Street
  • Rye Heritage Centre, The Strand
  • Adams of Rye, 8 High Street

Icklesham

  • Tea Beside the Orchard, Main Road, Icklesham, Winchelsea, TN36 4BH

And of course, ONLINE at www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

Short Walks in 1066 Country

From History Walks, Talks and Books

More than just footsteps on a Path. For more information visit: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

TAKING THE BUS FOR A WALK

TAKE THE BUS

And reach out to explore and discover the rich history of this corner of England

And the bus can be as much fun as the walk itself.

All the walks in the History Walks series of ‘Short Walks in 1066 Country’ are written to be bus friendly.

With no need to search the car parks and lay-bys for an empty parking space, you can just sit back and relax on a scenic bus journey and if you can manage to get the front seat on the top deck, all the better. There is no need to worry about the car.

There are flat walks for an easy stroll and more adventurous walks for the energetic. Distances stretch from 1¼ miles up to 10 miles and some can last for over three hours, depending on your fitness, and all with a bus stop or a station by the finish.

Look Inside  Taking the bus for a walk 2022 (pubhtml5.com)

WHERE WILL YOU WALK

DISCOVER ALL THE HISTORY WALKS @

www.1066haroldsway.co.uk

 More than just Footsteps on a Path

ADD WALKING TO BATTLE TO YOUR BUCKET LIST

Imagine almost 1000 years ago,

Leaving London to march in the army of King Harold

Marching to a Battle that will decide the future of England.

There is no more inspirational walk from London.

1066 Harold’s Way has fired the imagination for countless walkers to begin their adventure and walk to Battle.

With the addition of a link to Hastings Castle, 1066 Harold’s Way is now a perfect Capital to Coast walk.

Now is the time to add 1066 Harold’s Way to your Bucket List for 2022

Walking Capital to Coast: 1066 Harold’s Way

From History Walks, Talks and Books

More than just footsteps on a Path.

For more information visit: www.1066haroldsway.co.uk